5 posts categorized "Amalia Issa"

06/30/2015

Philly.com: Cabrini elects new Board of Trustees

Amalia M. Issa was newly elected to the board. Issa is a professor and chair of the department of health policy and public health at the University of the Sciences in Philadelphia.

Read more: http://www.philly.com/philly/education/20150630_Cabrini_elects_new_Board_of_Trustees.html

12/30/2014

Philly.com: On the Boards: Amalia Issa

Amalia M. Issa, professor and chair of the department of health policy and public health at Mayes College of Healthcare Business and Policy at University of the Sciences and founding director of the program in personalized medicine and targeted therapeutics, has been elected a fellow of the College of Physicians of Philadelphia.

Read: Philly.com: On the Boards

12/04/2014

USciences’ Amalia M. Issa Elected Fellow of The College of Physicians of Philadelphia

USciences’ Amalia M. Issa Elected Fellow of The College of Physicians of Philadelphia:

01/23/2014

The NY Times: How to Help Homeless Families

MetrauxThe New York Times opinion reporter David Bornstein (@dnbornstein) featured Stephen Metraux, PhD, associate professor of health policy and public health at University of the Sciences, in his Jan. 22 article regarding helping homeless families.

"Homelessness is an extremely adverse childhood experience. 'If you factor in the reduction of childhood trauma, the savings to society in the long run from prevention is considerable,' commented Stephen Metraux, associate professor of health policy and public health at University of the Sciences, who worked on the Homebase study."

Click here to read the entire article...

05/10/2012

Genomeweb: Economic Model Finds MammaPrint More Cost-Effective than Oncotype; Highlights Need for

In the study, researchers led by Amalia Issa of the University of the Sciences in Philadelphia developed a 10-year Markov model to compare the costs incurred and quality-adjusted life years gained when
oncologists used either Oncotype DX or MammaPrint to guide treatment decisions for a hypothetical cohort of 1,000 women with early-stage, estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer that hasn't spread to the lymph nodes.

Read more: http://www.genomeweb.com/mdx/economic-model-finds-mammaprint-more-cost-effective-oncotype-highlights-need-fut