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11/03/2014

Physics Prof's Book Discusses 'How Two Great Minds Battled Quantum Randomness to Create a Unified Theory of Physics'

BookA sabbatical research project two years ago at University of the Sciences inspired physics professor Dr. Paul Halpern’s new book “Einstein’s Dice and Schrodinger’s Cat:  How Two Great Minds Battled Quantum Randomness to Create a Unified Theory of Physics.”  Dr. Halpern is no stranger to authorship, as he has penned more than a dozen popular science books.

“Basically, my new book tells the story of how the friendship between Einstein and Schrodinger developed through their mutual dislike of quantum uncertainty, flourished as they sought a ‘theory of everything,’ and then crumbled during an international media fiasco,” said Dr. Halpern.

Dr. Halpern said that Albert Einstein and Erwin Schrödinger were friends and comrades-in-arms against what they considered the most preposterous aspects of quantum physics: its indeterminacy. Even though it was Einstein’s own theories that made quantum mechanics possible, both he and Schrödinger could not bear the idea that the universe was, at its most fundamental level, random.

Here’s an excerpt from the book’s description:

“Einstein famously quipped that God does not play dice with the universe, and Schrödinger is equally well known for his thought experiment about the cat in the box who ends up "spread out" in a probabilistic state, neither wholly alive nor wholly dead. Both of these famous images arose from these two men's dissatisfaction with quantum weirdness and with their assertion that underneath it all, there must be some essentially deterministic world. Even though it was Einstein's own theories that made quantum mechanics possible, both he and Schrödinger could not bear the idea that the universe was, at its most fundamental level, random.

 “As the Second World War raged, both men struggled to produce a theory that would describe in full the universe's ultimate design, first as collaborators, then as competitors. They both ultimately failed in their search for a Theory of Everything—not only because quantum mechanics is true, but because Einstein and Schrödinger were also missing a key component: of the four forces we recognize today (gravity, electromagnetism, the weak force, and the strong force), only gravity and electromagnetism were known at the time.

 “Despite their failures, though, much of modern physics remains focused on the search for a Theory of Everything. As Halpern explains, the recent discovery of the Higgs Boson makes the Standard Model—the closest thing we have to a unified theory—nearly complete. And while Einstein and Schrödinger tried and failed to explain everything in the cosmos through pure geometry, the development of string theory has, in its own quantum way, brought this idea back into vogue. As in so many things, even when he was wrong, Einstein couldn't help but be right.”

Dr. Halpern is the recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship, a Fulbright Scholarship, and an Athenaeum Literary Award. He has also appeared on numerous radio and television shows including Future Quest, Radio Times, several shows on the History Channel, and The Simpsons 20th Anniversary Special.

For more information regarding Dr. Halpern’s new book, or to make a purchase, click here.

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