13 posts categorized "Proven Everywhere Profiles"

04/18/2016

PCP Student Receives Travel Grant for National Conference

Christina Ly- Professional PictureChristina Ly PharmD’17 was one of only four students selected nationwide to receive a travel grant worth up to $2,500 from the American College of Apothecaries (ACA), International Academy of Compounding Pharmacists (IACP) and American College of Veterinary Pharmacists (ACVP) Foundations. Ly received the award at the 2016 ACA/IACP/ACVP Educational Conference held from February 24-27, 2016, in Coronado, CA.

The Educational Conference is a joint endeavor by the three hosting organizations, ACA, IACP, and ACVP. The conference provides continuing education sessions to pharmacists and pharmacy technicians that are focused on topics related to independent pharmacy, pharmaceutical compounding, pharmacy law, and veterinary pharmacy. In addition to attending educational sessions, travel grant winners have the opportunity to attend an association board meeting and network with working professionals from across the country. Information on the Educational Conference can be found at www.educationalconference.org.

04/07/2016

Usciences Research Gains Traction in Men's Health

USciences’ motto is “proven everywhere.” One reason why the “proven everywhere” motto makes sense for USciences is because we teach students, and professors themselves use scientific research as the basis for teaching and scholarship. One such area is the Health Policy Program at Mayes College of Healthcare Business & Policy. Health policy is the investigation of problems in health (not just healthcare and its delivery) in its broadest sense using scientific methods of study to develop evidence-based recommendations for changes and innovations in policy. One challenge is that policymakers sometimes eschew data and evidence when making policy; rather, they are sometimes drawn to its opposite – anecdotes – heart wrenching stories from constituents.

When data and evidence alone fail to inform policy, another option that is available is to make the best possible case for particular policies using the force of ethical argumentation. In this regard, evidence and data receive bolstering through analysis of the very values that undergird health and provide exhortation for particular policy approaches. This is the case with some recent work undertaken by Health Policy Ph.D. candidate Janna Manjelievskaia, MPH and Visiting Assistant Professor, David Perlman, Ph.D.

Janna was working with colleagues on a paper examining the policy issues associated with the current U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendations against testicular cancer screening. She suggested to her colleagues that perhaps the paper could be enhanced with an ethical angle. She asked Dr. Perlman, one of her professors who focuses on ethics in health policy and public health, to join in writing the paper, which was recently published in the American Journal of Men’s Health and presented at their conference. The lead author of the paper, Michael Rovito, Ph.D., an Assistant Professor at the University of Central Florida, was recently was interviewed by STAT about the importance of testicular self-examination. The paper, and the power of its ethical argument and coupled with careful, scientific examination of policy, are gaining traction with policymakers, which should hopefully result in a policy change by the USPSTF to change its current recommendation against testicular cancer screening. When that happens, it will be yet another instance of how USciences research and students are “proven everywhere.”

David Perlman, PhD

Janna Manjelievskaia, MPH

02/29/2016

Dancing in Honor of Black History Month

International Society’s Culture Shock is a multi-cultural dance group that has been representing University of the Sciences at several major events throughout the Greater Philadelphia area. On February 27, in honor of Black History Month, they were invited to perform at the Penn Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology Harrison Auditorium for its 27th Annual Celebration of African Cultures.

The group serves to promote cultural diversity and acceptance of underrepresented cultures through dance from all parts of the world. Last Fall Culture Shock was given the opportunity to share their many talents with audiences at the Community College of Philadelphia's "World Cultures Day" and at the University of Pennsylvania's Annual International Students and Scholars Welcome Reception, where students from local colleges and even international delegates came together to enjoy various activities and food displays from different cultures. In addition, Culture Shock represented the University at the HIAS Refugee Thanksgiving Dinner by performing and also volunteering to serve refugees a traditional Thanksgiving dinner.

11/17/2015

PCP Grads Pursue Residency Programs at the Johns Hopkins Hospital

Ekeoha-ijeomaSoon after Ijeoma Ekeocha PharmD'09 graduated from University of the Sciences in 2009, she followed her dream career as a pharmacist at Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore

During her time as a hospital pharmacist, Dr. Ekeocha became particularly interested in emergency medicine, internal medicine, diabetes management, patient education, and academia. After five years in that role, Dr. Ekeocha recently made the decision to expand her knowledge and education in the field and became a pharmacy practice resident at Johns Hopkins Hospital earlier this year. She plans to continue her training with a second year specialty residency.

Dr. Ekeocha said she is thankful to the hospital’s pharmacy department for providing her with a unique opportunity that will help her achieve her goal of becoming a clinical faculty member at a large academic institution.

Tolan-meghanRecent graduate Meghan E. Tolan PharmD’14 is also wrapping up a two-year health-system pharmacy administration residency at Johns Hopkins. This competitive program also gave her a chance to pursue an MBA in healthcare management at the Johns Hopkins Carey Business School.

Dr. Tolan’s professional interests, include quality improvement, regulatory affairs, clinical and operational management, transitions of care, academia, and professional pharmacy organizations. She currently serves as the resident member of the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists Commission on Credentialing.

10/21/2015

Student Physical Therapists Recognized at Patricia Leahy Memorial Lecture

JDP-3271Coinciding with Physical Therapy Month in October, more than 150 physical therapists, faculty, and students attended the 15th annual Patricia Leahy Memorial Lecture at University of the Sciences on Thursday, Oct. 15.  This year’s topic, “New Advances in the Management of Persons with Balance and Vestibular Disorders,” featured Dr. Susan Whitney, a Philadelphia born and raised physical therapist who is now a world-renowned researcher and specialty clinician in the area of vestibular rehabilitation.

 “The Leahy seminar is always a highlight of the year for the Department of Physical Therapy, and this year, we had a record number of alumni return for the evening event,” said Gregory Thielman, MSPT, EdD, associate professor of physical therapy and director of the Patricia Leahy Research Lab at USciences.

Each year, this on-campus event recognizes former USciences physical therapy professor Patricia (Patti) Leahy, who passed away Oct. 9, 1995, after a hard-fought battle against breast cancer.  Her areas of specialization were in teaching rehabilitation and neuroscience, and she was an active member of the American Physical Therapy Association and the Neurology Section.

Before her death, Leahy established a scholarship fund to financially assist USciences’ physical therapy students during clinical education, and proceeds from this lecture benefit this fund. She felt that it was important to enable students to expand their horizons by seeking clinical sites outside of the Philadelphia region.

JDP-3276Student physical therapists Tara Farnitano DPT’16 (above right) and Christine Kettle DPT’16 (left) were selected as the recipients of this year’s Patricia Leahy scholarships based off their impressive academic performance and passion for helping patients in neurological rehabilitation clinical settings.

“This evening consisted of two things that Patti enjoyed—learning and socializing, and we are honored to keep the memory of Professor Leahy alive on campus,” said Thielman.

Click here to see the 2015 Leahy Lecture photo gallery.

09/30/2015

Alum's Pharmacy Nationally Recognized for its Service to Community

HealthMart_Tepper_093015Pharmacy alumnus Craig Lehrman P’89, a second-generation pharmacist who learned the business from his father, was recently honored for consistently providing care and services that add measurable value to patient healthcare and community wellness. His independently-owned Tepper Pharmacy, located in Wynnewood, Pa., is one of 10 pharmacies across the country to receive the Health Mart Community Healthcare Excellence Award.

After graduating from Philadelphia College of Pharmacy in 1989, Lehrman gained most of his pharmacy experience working for others before he achieved his goal of owning a pharmacy in 2011. Over the past four years, Lehrman and his staff have continued to build upon Tepper Pharmacy’s rich 30-year history of delivering personalized care to the community.

“I was interested in the business aspect of pharmacy, but it was my father that guided me into the profession of pharmacy,” he said. “I was looking for a store to buy and even considered opening a new store from scratch, until the perfect opportunity arose to take over Tepper Pharmacy.”

In this new era of chain pharmacies and mail order prescriptions, one of the hallmarks of independent pharmacies, like Tepper, is their ability to understand and cater to the unique needs of their community.

“I want the service that we provide to make us unique,” Lehrman said. “The personal interactions we have with our customers is what makes us stand out and it is an important part of what makes Tepper Pharmacy a successful business.”

Beyond the traditional services most pharmacies offer, Tepper Pharmacy’s staff includes an employee who specializes in fittings for compression stockings and sleeves and is also an expert in durable medical equipment and wound care, a pharmacist who specializes in managing the medications for long-term care facilities in the area, and a pharmacy team that services local dialysis centers.

To help the community stay healthy, Tepper Pharmacy administers vaccinations, offers free delivery anywhere in the Philadelphia metropolitan area, and makes every attempt to fill all prescriptions by stocking a large inventory. These specialized and personalized services are just a few examples that exemplify the concern Lehrman and his pharmacy staff have for the community.

The Health Mart Community Healthcare Excellence Award program is a component of the Health Mart Healthy Living Tour, which is on the road to celebrate and recognize community pharmacists for the important role they play as trusted healthcare providers in their communities—helping to educate and counsel on a variety of conditions that can be better managed with the help of a pharmacist.  

“Health Mart pharmacies fill a gap in today’s busy healthcare system by providing broader access to clinical services and medication counseling, and our pharmacists often serve as the first point of care for everyone from new parents to grandparents,” said Chuck Wilson, vice president of Health Mart. “We recognize that issues like diabetes and obesity are serious epidemic affecting millions of Americans, and these 10 pharmacists have proven themselves as go-to resources for those in their community managing these diseases.”

09/14/2015

PT Student Says Doodling Can Aid Learning

Note3Unless a student is in an art class, drawing during a lecture is usually frowned upon. But Zachary Dae DPT'19 is a firm believer that mindless scribbling may actually aid the learning process, not hinder it.

“I have always wanted to work in the medical field, particularly with veterans and people with prosthetics,” said Dae. “I have put some serious thought into careers that would allow me to showcase my artistic abilities and medical education, and designing prosthetics seems like a very interesting route to take after I graduate from USciences.”

His notebooks are full of sketches of intricate cell models and the human anatomy–drawings he feels represent a balance between work and play.

“There are two main reasons I use artwork in my notes: the first being visual reference and the second being enjoyment,” said Dae. “When I draw the pictures in my notes, I usually draw them right after the section that describes them, that way I'll have a picture to show everything and verify everything I have just read or have written.”

Note1Dae said his first semester at USciences was a wake-up call for him to change his study habits because he was not earning the types of grades that he did in high school and was not focused on his school work. Luckily, he said he developed mentorships with biology professors Drs. Dana Pape-Zambito, Catherine Purzycki, and Grace Farber, and each of them supported and encouraged his unique note-taking method because it helped him zero in on his schoolwork and retain the information he learned in class.

As for now, Dae is working toward his goal of completing his doctor of physical therapy degree and is happy to share his drawings with his classmates to help prepare them for homework assignments and exams.

08/19/2015

PCP Students Provide Faith-Based Healthcare to Underserved Philly Residents

SMI_20151Five students from Philadelphia College of Pharmacy collaborated with more than two dozen medical, dental, podiatry, and nursing students from various colleges across Philadelphia during this year’s Summer Medical Institute (SMI) Philadelphia. This three-week health outreach program is sponsored by the Medical Campus Outreach ministry of Tenth Presbyterian Church in Philadelphia and Esperanza Health Center.

“Teams of health professions students helped address the health and spiritual needs of residents in the Kensington and Hunting Park neighborhoods of Philadelphia,” said Daniel Hussar, PhD, Remington Professor of Pharmacy at University of the Sciences. “This unique experience allowed students to learn how to integrate their faith with their responsibilities as health professionals.”

After initial training sessions, Sherilin Joe PharmD’16, Rebecca Shatynski PharmD’16, Julie Varughese PharmD’16, Megan Pellett PharmD’16, and Christina Besada PhSci’17 joined their peers to conduct door-to-door health outreach in teams throughout the neighborhoods—offering diabetes and blood pressure screenings, as well as nutrition and healthy lifestyle education.

Students also lived together in community, and learned first-hand the impact of social, cultural, emotional, spiritual, and economic factors on individuals’ health. Through interaction with clinicians and staff members at Esperanza Health Center, Dr. Hussar said the students were able to observe an effective model of Christian primary healthcare.

Here’s a break-down of the recorded visits and activities completed by the students during SMI:

  • 630 visits to homes were conducted with health screenings provided
  • 787 blood pressure screens
    • 97 new positives for pre-hypertension were identified
    • 117 new positives for hypertension were identified
  • 756 blood sugar screens
    • 68 new positives for diabetes were identified
  • 737 BMI screens
  • 130 dental screens
  • 68 received in-home HIV testing
  • 200 people received asthma education
  • 917 people were prayed with
  • 87 people requested church follow-up

Following the conclusion of SMI, USciences students made follow-up phone calls to individuals with whom visits were made.  They also met with alumnus Neil Pitts P'73, PharmD'04 and visited the Miriam Medical Clinic that he started at Berean Baptist Church in North Philadelphia.

07/21/2015

Jamaican a Difference: PCP Students Complete Interprofessional Medical Mission Trip

5
Left to right: Pharmacy students Joellen Friedman, Brie Kassamura, Nitin Bagga, Julian Kam, Grace Park and Monika Cios.

Pharmacy student Nitin Bagga PharmD'16 observed closely as a middle-aged Jamaican woman—with teeth rotted well into her gum line—underwent an oral exam at a free health clinic in Kingston. Until that day, the woman had no means of getting medical attention or hope that the pain would come to an end.

Stories like this highlighted all of the reasons why nearly a dozen pharmacy students and professors from University of the Sciences made the journey to Jamaica last month to participate in an interprofessional medical mission trip.

It was a mission to help others, to learn about a culture 1,500 miles from Philadelphia, to gain work experience, and to come away better people. It was a mission to give back.

“This trip was a humbling experience to say the least…seeing the poverty in different parts of the world and being able to help so many in need was extremely rewarding,” said Bagga. “Working with the different healthcare professionals on the trip has prepared me to be the best pharmacist I can be.”

Bagga was accompanied on this trip by his classmates Joellen Friedman PharmD’16, Brie Kassamura PharmD’16, Julian Kam PharmD’16, Grace Park PharmD’16, and Monika Cios PharmD’16; and pharmacy professors Drs. Shelley Otsuka, Jessica Adams, and Yvonne Phan.

The pharmacy group from USciences joined a large team of healthcare practitioners and professional students from Nova Southeastern University and Women of Health Occupation Promoting Education (H.O.P.E.) to provide essential medical services to Jamaicans in critical need of quality medical and dental care, health awareness education, and pediatric care.

By the end of the trip, the team had provided care to more than 3,000 patients at prisons, churches, schools, and hotels across rural and urban communities in Jamaica. In fact, the USciences pharmacy team filled more than 5,000 prescriptions for these patients.

The Philadelphia College of Pharmacy students had many responsibilities before, during, and after the mission trip, said Dr. Otsuka. They prepared for the trip by updating the medication guide-use tools, reviewing the medication formulary, developing patient education pamphlets, creating a continuing medical education presentation handout, and constructing a research project that included a protocol. In addition, they held disease-state topic discussions with their instructors to help review treatment guidelines.

MissionTrip
Joellen Friedman PharmD’16 provides patient counseling to a mother and her young daughter.

The students also collected donations from pharmaceutical companies, alumni, and local businesses, such as SunRay Drugs and ACME Savon Pharmacies. As a result of their efforts, approximately 75 different medications were used to treat a variety of patient conditions in Jamaica. They also held fundraisers in the spring to offset their housing expenses for the trip and to raise money to purchase medical supplies, including gloves, hand sanitizer, and Ziploc bags—which functioned as the medication vial.

During the trip, the students had the opportunity to work alongside healthcare practitioners and students in the fields of medicine, physical and occupational therapy, and dentistry. They also managed a closed formulary system and maintained an accurate medication inventory system, as well as filled, compounded, and labeled medications, and counseled patients on new medications—all under the guidance of their professors.

When the students returned to Philadelphia, Dr. Otsuka said they took stock of their inventory, wrote self-reflection essays, and gathered and analyzed data for a scholarly project. She said they plan to submit an abstract and research poster for the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists' Midyear Clinical Meeting, and share their experience with peers and underclassmen this fall.

Throughout the trip, each healthcare profession interacted with pharmacy in a unique and collaborative way, said Park.

“Pharmacy was truly an equally integrative part of the healthcare system and care of the patient,” Park said. “Being able to be a part of that and see it occur in one room was an unforgettable experience.”

CLICK HERE TO SEE A PHOTO GALLERY FROM THE TRIP

06/22/2015

Future Physician Assistants Gained Invaluable Experience in Honduras

HondurasAspiring physician assistants Aisha Malik PA’17, Emily Coraci PA'17, and Emily Kobayashi PA’17 were among a team of physician assistant students who recently traveled to Honduras with Philadelphia University’s Global Medical Brigades chapter to provide free medical services to those without access to quality healthcare.

“These students served Honduran communities that truly relied on them for their medical necessities,” said Joan Ward, MS, PA-C, chair of the physician assistant studies program at USciences. “They undoubtedly left a positive impact on a culture where access to medical care and equipment is limited, while also gaining invaluable experience in their field.”

Malik, Coraci, and Kobayashi worked closely with doctors, physician assistants, dentists, pharmacists, and community members to provide direct medical care for patients in rural, underserved communities that would otherwise have no access to medical care. More particularly, they were able to to take vitals and patient history in triage, shadow licensed doctors in medical consultations, and assist in a pharmacy under the direction of licensed pharmacists.

Honduras2Coraci said the trip served as a learning experience across all aspects of life, not just her profession. For instance, the students learned a new culture and interacted with patients of all ages who did not speak English. During a visit to a community outside of San Lorenzo, Honduras, Coraci said a local family welcomed her medical brigade into their home and even taught them how to make tortillas.

Honduras is ranked as the third poorest country in the Western Hemisphere after Haiti and Nicaragua, and has been designated as a “priority country” by the Pan American Health organization/WHO Strategic Plan. The basic needs of education, healthcare, and clean water are luxuries for most Hondurans, but in the rural communities where the team of students served, these luxuries are even harder to find.

© 2011 University of the Sciences in Philadelphia • 600 South 43rd Street • Philadelphia, PA 19104 • 215.596.8800