12 posts categorized "Medical Technology"

10/28/2014

USciences Prez, Students and Faculty Attended Life Sciences Future in Philly

PABioLSF14_-138University of the Sciences President Dr. Helen-Giles Gee, as well as students and faculty from USciences, joined hundreds of life sciences leaders and innovators during the Life Sciences Future Conference on Oct. 13-14 in Philadelphia.

Life Sciences Future was a two-day event designed by Pennsylvania Bio to reflect the rapidly-evolving landscape in healthcare - which includes biopharma, medical device and diagnostics, healthcare IT, contract research organizations, medical research institutions, and the investment community.

The first day of the event kicked off with Life Sciences Future Symposium: Partnerships in Science, which was designed for an exclusive audience of academic researchers, such as USciences students and faculty, to explore best practices for engaging business development representatives at large companies as well as the next steps in developing their technologies. The second day of the conference was jam-packed with speakers, topics and features all related to advancing science and healthcare industries.

Dr. Giles-Gee and students had the opportunity to meet and speak with Michael Sofia, inventor of Sofosbuvir – known by the brand name Sovaldi, a hepatitis C therapy drug approved by the FDA last December.

“The sessions were outstanding and much appreciated by the faculty and students who attended," Dr. Giles-Gee.

04/11/2014

VIDEO: 6abc Highlights Students, Faculty at USciences Research Day

 
 
6abc showcased the diversity and growth of research pursuits at University of the Sciences during its 12th Annual Research Day and 27th Annual John C. Krantz, Jr., Distinguished Lecture on Thursday, April 10. Research Day recognizes and highlights the research efforts of faculty, as well as undergraduate and graduate students, to encourage and promote communication and collaboration among researchers.
 
USciences distinguishes itself by offering undergraduate students the opportunity to conduct research early in their academic careers. The diverse research activity that was on display spanned several aspects of the University’s scholarly pursuits, including:
  • Determining occupational therapists’ role in working with pediatric cancer patients
  • Discovering the personality traits that cause adolescents to kill
  • Using yoga to improve quality of life for patients with anorexia nervosa
  • Identifying predictors of successful post-secondary transitions for autistic students

02/19/2014

First Pharmacy Students Now Trained in Advanced Life Support

BinghamWith critical care pharmacy surfacing as a staple in intensive care, prospective pharmacists now complete high levels of life support training to increase patient survival.

Advanced Cardiovascular Life Support (ACLS) is a team-based response strategy used to optimize the survival of patients in life-threatening cardiac emergencies. Pharmacist participation on these rapid-response teams is associated with lower mortality rates, emphasizing a need for future pharmacists to get trained.

“Pharmacy students on their Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience rotations in the hospital setting will likely encounter code situations. Many of the treatment algorithms require pharmaceutical intervention, and it is valuable for pharmacy students to be involved and educated on how to treat patients in these situations,” said Meghan Tolan PharmD’14, who became ACLS certified in 2013.

Prior to taking the course, students are expected to understand pharmacological aspects specific to cardiopulmonary arrest and reach proficiency in identifying cardiac arrhythmias. Basic Life Support for Healthcare Provider certification is also required.

“As part of the curriculum at USciences, student pharmacists receive didactic education regarding ACLS that is reinforced through high-fidelity mannequin simulation,” said Angela L. Bingham PharmD, BCPS, BCNSP, (pictured above) an assistant professor of clinical pharmacy at USciences' Philadelphia College of Pharmacy (PCP).

To achieve ACLS certification, students must then complete a 12-hour training program through the American Heart Association. Developing their skills, students practice and perform these life-saving interventions at an on-campus simulation laboratory.

Three PCP students have completed the certification thus far, including Tolan, Julia Weiner PharmD’14, and Michael Flacco, Jr., PharmD’15.

“By developing fundamentals in basic life support, management approaches for various life-threatening situations, related pharmacology, and effective resuscitation team dynamics, Julia, Meghan, and Michael are ready to save lives when they become licensed pharmacists,” said Dr. Bingham.

Trained critical care pharmacists will use their expertise to assist in a variety of scenarios as part of an interdisciplinary team. To find more information on ACLS certification, email Dr. Bingham at a.bingham@usciences.edu.

Article written by Christine Luczka
University of the Sciences Marketing and Communications Dept.

02/06/2014

The Biggest Mistakes Transfer Students Make

Viggiani_aimeeChoosing which college to attend is a huge decision for students. Whether they’ve earned their associate’s degrees from community colleges and ready to move on to earn their bachelor’s degrees, or currently enrolled in four-year schools that aren’t the right fit, one-third of all students transfer at least once before earning a degree.

Aimee Viggiani, associate director of transfer admissions, was recently featured in two articles which provide helpful tips for transfer students. She said, "All too often, students wait until too late in their college careers to ask why a certain class didn't transfer. Even if you don't need the credit right away, you may need it in the future. So ask transfer credit questions as soon as possible."

10/31/2013

Mayes Students 'Already Know More About ACA than Most Docs'

MetrauxLed by Stephen Metraux PhD, interim director of the Health Policy Program, masters and doctoral students in the Department of Health Policy and Public Health are examining the Patient Protection and ACA as it evolves in real time. Here's what he has to say about the course:

Last summer, the faculty the Department of Health Policy and Public Health at University of the Sciences decided to implement a seminar course devoted to the Affordable Care Act for the Fall 2013 semester.  We realized with the exchanges set to come online in October, this would be a unique opportunity to observe and assess policy as it unfolded, and that it would likely entail a wild, unpredictable ride.  As the person who first pitched this idea, I got to facilitate the class.

The course consists of three touch points – studying the nuts and bolts of the ACA based on reading about the act and its implementation; a series of speakers who would come into the class and give in-depth presentations  related to specific aspects of the ACA; and taking time each class to discuss the week’s events related to the ACA.  Taken together, the class has been exciting, interesting and informative. 

The speakers so far have included community perspectives from hospitals, physicians and public health providers, as well as University faculty talking about the economics, political science and occupational therapy perspectives of the ACA.  The nine students enrolled in the class have each taken one of the nine titles (i.e., sections) of the original ACA and have delved into the details.  And finally, the government shutdown, the debacle of healthcare.gov, and the individual policy cancellations have been the backdrop behind a greater awareness and a greater understanding of the headlines.

Based on this, students from the class will, in the upcoming days, provide brief entries for this blog related to specific ACA-related topics upon which they are focusing.  The first entries in this series came from Tom Godfrey, a physician and PhD Health Policy student:


My contribution to this is a top-ten list of general themes about the ACA that have become clear through this course. 

10. To focus on the individual mandate is to miss 90 percent of the ACA.
  9. If you are sick and poor before the ACA you will likely remain sick and poor after the ACA.
  8. The ACA is sitting on the shoulders of over a century of health care reform efforts.
  7. It is possible to have too little income to benefit from the ACA.
  6. Public health never gets the money it needs.
  5. The ACA just ain’t socialized medicine in any form.
  4. To work, the ACA must hit the health care trifecta: simultaneously expanded coverage, improved quality, and reduced costs.
  3. Opponents hate the ACA; proponents see it as a set of necessary compromises.
  2. No one knows whether and how the ACA will work.

[insert drum roll…]

  1. Students in the class already know more about the ACA than most physicians.

Stay tuned.


10/02/2013

Dean of Mayes College Weighs In on Affordable Care Act

APeterson_250x350Andrew Peterson PharmD, PhD, John Wyeth Dean of Mayes College of Healthcare Business and Policy, recently published an article titled, "Healthcare Exchanges Open for Business" in the Star Life Sciences Medical Monitor.

As of Oct 1, 2013, many U.S. citizens will be able to purchase health insurance through an online marketplace called the Healthcare Exchange. Purchasing insurance through this mechanism is not available to employees who choose to receive insurance through their employer, or citizens who receive Medicare or Medicaid. 

Click here to read the entire article...

As of today, Oct 1st, 2013, many US citizens will be able to purchase health insurance through an online marketplace called the Healthcare Exchange. Purchasing insurance through this mechanism is not available to employees who choose to receive insurance through their employer, or citizens who receive Medicare or Medicaid. - See more at: http://www.starlifebrands.com/healthcare-exchanges-open-for-business/#sthash.6jehUNdO.dpuf

09/26/2013

Mayes College Professor Published in CEA Registry

A study published in 2012 by Amalia M. Issa, PhD, chair of The Department of Health Policy and Public Health,  titled, “Cost effectiveness of gene expression profiling for early stage breast cancer: a decision-analytic model,” has been recently included in the Tufts Medical Center Cost-Effectiveness Analysis (CEA) Registry.

Issa_PortraitThis registry is a comprehensive database of more than 3,604 English-language cost-utility analyses on a wide variety of diseases and treatments. It catalogs information on more than 9,800 cost-effectiveness ratios, and more than 13,500 utility weights published in the peer-reviewed literature. The registry also details studies published from 1976 through 2012, and is regularly updated.

Many of the articles included in the registry are used by policy makers, and are used or cited in analyses performed by the U.S. Environmental Agency, Food and Drug Administration, Institute of Medicine, Medicare Payment Assessment Commission, academia and industry. All articles undergo a rigorous screening and review process prior to their selection and inclusion in the registry.

09/18/2013

PCP Student: High Tech Tools for Medication Adherence

Anita Pothen is currently a 6th year pharmacy student at the University of the Sciences-Philadelphia College of Pharmacy. In addition to her interests in medication adherence and writing, Anita's pharmacy-related experiences include working in retail, hospital and government agency settings. - See more at: http://www.starlifebrands.com/author/apothen/#sthash.qLh4jlSX.d

Anita Pothen PharmD'14, published an article in Star Life Sciences Medical Monitor on Sept. 18, 2013, titled, "High Tech Tools for Medication Adherence."

Medication adherence is a topic of interest for healthcare providers, caregivers, and payers — and, of course, patients. Practitioners work hard to select optimal drug therapy for their patients, but they don’t always see the expected clinical improvements.

Click here to read the full article...

Medication adherence is a topic of interest for healthcare providers, caregivers, and payers—and, of course, patients. Practitioners work hard to select optimal drug therapy for their patients, but they don’t always see the expected clinical improvements. This inefficacy in treatment often stems from patients’ inability - See more at: http://www.starlifebrands.com/author/apothen/#sthash.qLh4jlSX.dpuf

09/16/2013

Health Tip: Skinny, Fat, Old, Young: All at Risk for High Cholesterol

image from www.gradschool.usciences.eduTo attract customers, restaurant chains have been rolling out budget deals, offering $5 pizzas, $3 meals — even $1 sandwiches. But while these new offerings are light on its customers’ wallets, they hit them where it hurts in terms of calories, fat, and sodium content.

Unfortunately, some of most common patrons of these restaurants are college students looking to get the best bang for their buck. In observance of National Cholesterol Education Month, Karin Richards, interim chair of the Department of Kinesiology and program director of health sciences at University of Sciences, addresses important heart-healthy tips to help college students avoid serious health conditions down the road.

 “Nobody can eat anything they want and stay heart-healthy because all body types are at risk for high cholesterol,” said Richards. “While overweight people are more likely to have high cholesterol, thin people should also have their cholesterol checked regularly because people who don’t gain weight easily are less aware of how much fat they actually consume.”

  1. Check your family tree. Familial hypercholesterolemia is a disorder of high LDL, or bad, cholesterol that is passed down through families, which means it is inherited. Because the condition begins at birth and can cause heart attacks at an early age, it is vital for young adults to be in tune with their families’ health backgrounds.
  2. Moderation is key. While fried and fast foods do not have to be completely eliminated from diets; they should be consumed sporadically rather than every day.
  3. Substitute foods. Because egg yolk boasts high cholesterol, opt for egg whites instead. The same concept can be applied when choosing snacks, go for air popped popcorn over potato chips. There’s a healthy alternative to every meal.
  4. Get moving. Too many people focus on their diets, and neglect exercise. Aim to “move” for 30 minutes each day by taking the stairs instead of the elevator, parking further away in a parking lot, or jogging, walking, biking, and rollerblading as means of transportation. 
  5. Get screened. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention , the level of bad cholesterol among young adults ranges from 7 percent to 26 percent; however, the screening rate among this age group is less than 50 percent.

Richards said University of the Sciences students are offered free cholesterol and body composition screenings through its Department of Kinesiology. If abnormal results are recorded, students are encouraged to visit their primary care providers for further examination.

“Sometimes it takes eye-opening results for young adults to see that they are not invincible to potentially fatal health conditions, like heart disease. It’s never too late to start the transformation to a healthy lifestyle,” said Richards.

Richards obtained a Master of Science in sport management from Slippery Rock University, and is currently pursuing her doctorate in health policy at USciences. She is nationally certified as a wellness practitioner and wellness program coordinator by the National Wellness Institute, National Strength and Conditioning Association, and American College of Sports Medicine.

08/29/2013

USciences' Dr. Rondalyn Whitney Appointed to Telemedicine Task Force’s Clinical Advisory Group

By Rondalyn V. Whitney, PhD, OT/L, interim director of the occupational therapy doctoral program at USciences.

I recently had the opportunity to attend the Telemedicine Task Force’s (TTF) Clinical Advisory Group (CAG) in Maryland and learn more about the current guiding principles for the group. The CAG was established to identify ways the expansion of telemedicine would be valuable and feasible as a mechanism to increase access to care primarily for those in rural settings throughout Maryland.

As you may know, there are multiple intersections between technology and the provision of occupational therapy. In the OT profession, our role falls under the overarching construct of telehealth – using online tools to provide clinical care at a distance. In comparison, telemedicine – which is more physician driven – is one service model.

The body of work generated by Jana Carson, Tammy Richmond, and other OT practitioners and scholars have created a collection of scholarship to that solidly establishes the role of OT in telehealth practice.This information became invaluable when I was asked to attend Telemedicine Task Force’s Clinical Advisory Group, and advocate for the role of OT in the evolving legislative conversation of how telemedicine will be regulated in the state.

Maryland’s Senate Bill 776 charges the task force to identify opportunities for to improve health status for its underserved populations, assess barriers and support to telehealth, identify strategies for deployment, and provide response as requested by Maryland Health Care Commission. There are three advisory groups attached: clinical, finance and business model, and technology solutions and standards. The state's Senate Bill 781 requires health insurers and managed care organizations to deliver coverage for healthcare services provided appropriately using telemedicine technology. Under this legislation, coverage cannot be denied because services were provided through telemedicine rather than in-person.

The first meeting of the CAG established overarching guiding principles and engaged in robust debate regarding the prioritization of requirements of Senate Bill 776 as they related to clinical practice. One major outcome of the discussion was the change in terminology from “telemedicine” to “telehealth” so the profession of OT would be legal recognized as a pivotal service provider if the ultimate goal is to improve public health while maintaining affordable care. The import of this seemingly simple change in language should not be overlooked for our profession and the public we serve. Outcome studies demonstrate the improved health and function of clients who receive OT. Another important change was the conversion of “patient” to “public” therefore opening telehealth services for practice settings beyond hospital based care.

Finally, the CAG prioritized the examination of reciprocity of state licensure. It was a privilege to be at this meeting and I am very excited to have had the opportunity to represent MOTA and advance the important role of OT in telehealth. I will be attending future meetings and look forward to reporting back to the profession additional information as this conversation evolves. For more information contact the Maryland Health Care Commission at mhccdhmh.maryland.gov.

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