28 posts categorized "Health Science"

10/25/2016

More Faculty, Staff, Student and Alumni Achievements

Karin Richards, chair of the department of kinesiology, presented at the Regional Conference on Aging on the topic Calm Minds, Active Bodies.

She will also be presenting at on “Applying Behavior Change Techniques” at a workshop in Richmond Virginia.

Richards was also selected as a master trainer by the American Council on Exercise for applying behavior change techniques


 Paula Kramer PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, director of the post-professional doctor of occupational therapy program, has been invited to give the keynote address for the New York State Occupational Therapy Association conference on November 5.


 Dorela Priftanji PharmD’17 was awarded the Pennsylvania Society of Health System Pharmacists Student of the Year Award at the annual assembly.


 Several faculty members and former colleagues were published in the American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education, Vol. 80, Issue 7. “Variables Affecting Pharmacy Students’ Patient Care Interventions during Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experiences” was a collaborative effort of Laura Bio PharmD, Brandon Patterson PharmD, PhD, Shanta Sen PharmD, Angela Bingham PharmD, Jane Bowen PharmD, Ben Ereshefsky PharmD, and Laura Siemianowski PharmD.


Jim Holaska PhD, associate professor of pharmaceutical sciences, recently published two articles listed below. One of the articles was a comprehensive review of diseases associated with mutations in nuclear envelope proteins and the proposed disease mechanisms. The second review focused on the cellular function of one of these proteins named emerin and how mutations in this protein cause muscle disease.

  1. Holaska, J. M. 2016. Diseases of the Nucleoskeleton. Comprehensive Physiology. 6:1655–1674.
  2. Collins, C. M., Nee, K. A. and Holaska, J. M. 2016. The Nuclear Envelope Protein Emerin and Its Interacting Proteins. eLS. 1–9.

Jessica Adams PharmD, assistant professor of clinical pharmacy, attended the 6th Clinical Pharmacy Summit in Manila, Philippines Sept 16-18th as faculty for ACCP. She presented on HIV, tuberculosis, sexually transmitted infections, opportunistic and fungal infections, and intra-abdominal infections to a group of pharmacists from the Philippine Pharmacists Association who are preparing to take the BCPS exam.


Amy Jessop PhD, MPH, associate professor of health policy and public health, and a recent grad, Muhamed Gashat MPH ’16 penned a paper entitled "Barriers to HCV Treatment in Methadone Users" was highlighted on the National Aids Treatment Advocacy Project (NATAP.ORG).


 Evana Patel PhB'16 won best paper in her session at the Academy of Business Research Fall 2016 Conference in Atlantic City

03/10/2015

USciences to Host Panel on LGBT Healthcare on April 1

LGBTStriving to address the healthcare needs in the LGBT community, University of the Sciences has teamed up with local nonprofit organizations to host its first Panel on LGBT Healthcare on Wednesday, April 1, from 7-9 p.m., in Griffith Hall (43rd Street at Woodland Avenue).

“This event is intended to bring together students and community members to learn more about the unique needs and challenges faced by the LGBT community in regards to accessing healthcare,” said AJ Young, coordinator of the event at USciences.

Panelists from ActionAIDS, Philadelphia FIGHT, Mazzoni Center, GALAEI, and the Center for Advocacy for the Rights and Interests of the Elderly (CARIE) will give a brief overview of their organization’s work and mission, discuss current issues and pressing needs in LGBT healthcare, and share what they believe is important for future healthcare professionals to know about working with the LGBT community. There will also be time for questions from the audience.

Invited panelists, include:

  • Tiffany Thompson, Director, Youth-Health Empowerment Project at Philadelphia FIGHT
  • Elaine Dutton, Trans Clinical Services Coordinator, Mazzoni Center
  • Elicia Gonzalez, Executive Director, GALAEI
  • Jay Johnson, Volunteer Coordinator & PWA, ActionAIDS
  • Rosemary Daub, Medical Case Manager Coordinator, ActionAIDS
  • Han Meadway, Transportation Advocate, CARIE

“Our speakers are some of the most knowledgeable and passionate people in Philadelphia regarding LGBT issues, and they’re eager to highlight what future healthcare professionals should know to provide quality care that treats LGBT patients with respect and dignity, while addressing their unique and not-so-unique health concerns,” said Young.

This event is free and open to the public, and light refreshments will be served after the panel. For more information, contact Young at a.young@usciences.edu or 215.596.8734.

10/30/2014

Samson College Kicks Off 'Allied Health Week' on Nov. 3

Samson College of Health Sciences at University of the Sciences will kick off its Allied Health Week on Monday, Nov. 3, with "Mindful Meditation" at 12:15 p.m. in the IPEX, second floor.

Here's the agenda for the rest of the week:

Tuesday, Nov. 4 at 1 p.m. | IPEX, Room 139 | "FED UP"

Everything we’ve been told about food and exercise for the past 30 years is dead wrong. "Fed Up" is the film the food industry doesn’t want you to see.

Wednesday, Nov. 5 at noon | IPEX Steps

“Walk with me Wednesday”

Thursday, Nov. 6 at 1 p.m. | IPEX, second floor

“Guiding Flame” Sculpture Dedication
(Dessert reception following dedication)

1 p.m. in ARC | IPE Volleyball Tournament

Anyone interested in signing up must sign up with a team of 6 in 4500 Woodland, Suite 100 by Wednesday, Nov. 5

10/28/2014

USciences Prez, Students and Faculty Attended Life Sciences Future in Philly

PABioLSF14_-138University of the Sciences President Dr. Helen-Giles Gee, as well as students and faculty from USciences, joined hundreds of life sciences leaders and innovators during the Life Sciences Future Conference on Oct. 13-14 in Philadelphia.

Life Sciences Future was a two-day event designed by Pennsylvania Bio to reflect the rapidly-evolving landscape in healthcare - which includes biopharma, medical device and diagnostics, healthcare IT, contract research organizations, medical research institutions, and the investment community.

The first day of the event kicked off with Life Sciences Future Symposium: Partnerships in Science, which was designed for an exclusive audience of academic researchers, such as USciences students and faculty, to explore best practices for engaging business development representatives at large companies as well as the next steps in developing their technologies. The second day of the conference was jam-packed with speakers, topics and features all related to advancing science and healthcare industries.

Dr. Giles-Gee and students had the opportunity to meet and speak with Michael Sofia, inventor of Sofosbuvir – known by the brand name Sovaldi, a hepatitis C therapy drug approved by the FDA last December.

“The sessions were outstanding and much appreciated by the faculty and students who attended," Dr. Giles-Gee.

09/15/2014

Ladies: Don’t Slack on Your Preventative Health Care, Says USciences Prof

SeptAwarenessAs young women across the United States adapt to their busy college lifestyles, physician assistant studies professor Joan Ward, MS, PA-C, at University of the Sciences in Philadelphia, urges them to stay on top of their preventative health screenings.

"Many students assume their young age makes them invincible to diseases and conditions, like cancer,” said Ward, chair of the Department of Physician Studies at USciences. “By staying proactive with your health, you’re more likely to avoid illness and maintain a healthier and enjoyable lifestyle for many years to come.”

In observation of National Gynecologic Cancer Awareness Month in September, Ward encourages young women to learn about the preventatives measures, risk factors, and symptoms associated with gynecologic cancers – such as cervical, ovarian, vulvar, and vaginal cancers.

Ward_Joan_250x350According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the human papillomavirus (HPV) is the most common sexually transmitted virus in the United States, and at least half of every sexually active person will acquire HPV at some point in their lives. Strains of this virus are also closely linked with gynecological cancers; thus, highlighting the importance of receiving the HPV vaccination at an early age.

Ward said the following tips can help protect young women from developing serious health conditions down the road: 

  • Visit the doc. Young women ages 21 and older, and those who are sexually active, should adhere to routine visits to a gynecologist office each year for Pap smears. This test is the one of the most reliable and effective cancer screening tests available, according to the CDC.
  • Get vaccinated. HPV vaccines are safe and effective, and administered in three doses over six months. This vaccine is most effective when given at a young age, and helps protect men and women from developing gynecological cancers.
  • Kick the habit. According to the CDC, smoking puts women at a higher risk for developing gynecological cancers.
  • Stay alert. Pay attention to your body, and contact your doctor if you experience any types of symptoms that do not seem right.

08/12/2014

Back-to-School Season Means Time for Moms and Dads to Make Exercise a Priority, Says USciences Prof

Richards_RunningAs parents prepare to send their children back to school over the next few weeks, kinesiology professor Karin Richards at University of the Sciences, says now is the perfect time for them to create an exercise plan that suits their new family schedules.

“Forget New Year's resolutions, the start of a child’s school year can also be the start of a new fitness and exercise program for parents,” said Richards. “In preparation of a brand new school year filled with countless extracurricular activities, it’s important for mom and dad to plan ahead to make sure that they are getting the necessary amount of exercise.”

According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, adults should strive for at least 150 minutes of moderate-intensity aerobic activity – such as brisk walking – each week. The agency also recommends incorporating muscle-strengthening activities into exercise routines at least two times per week.

Luckily, Richards said, these healthy guidelines can be easily achieved without blocking off a large chunk of the day or needing a gym membership.

  • Create a schedule: A weekly or monthly calendar of your work schedule, school functions, appointments, and other responsibilities is a tangible source of planning that will help you identify the best time each day to fit in exercise. 
  • Break it up: Even if you only have three 10-minute breaks throughout the day to squeeze in a workout, it’s better than doing nothing. An outdoor walk during a lunch break is also a great way to include exercise into a busy schedule.
  • Use your legs: Skip the elevator and take the stairs; be sure to lift your knees high during each step. Also, rather than drop off your children at the bus stop, take a family walk to the stop and add in calf raises off of the curb while waiting for the bus to arrive.
  • Use your body weight: Push-ups, bridges, planks, and squats are exercises that can be done in the privacy of your own home while watching television, listening to music, or helping children with their homework. These exercises can be modified for beginners and advanced fitness levels.
  • Stay active: Instead of sitting in the car or bleachers while your child is at sports practice or play dates, consider jogging around the field or park during practice. You can still pay attention, but you are also burning calories.

“The dog days of summer are slowly coming to an end, and parents will soon be faced with schedule overload and afterschool activities,” said Richards. “But don’t let that keep you from adapting a healthy lifestyle; planning, organizing, and even mixing in a quick work out here and there, will have moms and dads well on their way to becoming more active and prioritizing exercise in their lives.”

Related media exposure:

04/11/2014

VIDEO: 6abc Highlights Students, Faculty at USciences Research Day

 
 
6abc showcased the diversity and growth of research pursuits at University of the Sciences during its 12th Annual Research Day and 27th Annual John C. Krantz, Jr., Distinguished Lecture on Thursday, April 10. Research Day recognizes and highlights the research efforts of faculty, as well as undergraduate and graduate students, to encourage and promote communication and collaboration among researchers.
 
USciences distinguishes itself by offering undergraduate students the opportunity to conduct research early in their academic careers. The diverse research activity that was on display spanned several aspects of the University’s scholarly pursuits, including:
  • Determining occupational therapists’ role in working with pediatric cancer patients
  • Discovering the personality traits that cause adolescents to kill
  • Using yoga to improve quality of life for patients with anorexia nervosa
  • Identifying predictors of successful post-secondary transitions for autistic students

03/18/2014

USciences to Host Free Community Discussion on Obamacare on March 25

image from http://aviary.blob.core.windows.net/k-mr6i2hifk4wxt1dp-14031814/2f4ccb5f-6934-41af-8cba-dc9a00245936.png
Rep. Roebuck

As the Affordable Care Act’s March 31 enrollment deadline draws near, University of the Sciences, in conjunction with state Rep. James Roebuck (D-Philadelphia), will host a discussion regarding this complex law on Tuesday, March 25, from 7-8 p.m., at the University’s Rosenberger Hall, Room 101, located at 45th Street and Woodland Avenue.

During the event, Alicia C. Miller, health information data analyst in the University’s Student Health and Counseling Center; and Andrew Peterson PharmD, PhD, John Wyeth Dean of the University’s Mayes College of Healthcare Business and Policy, will present data to help individuals make informed choices about the new health insurance options that are available to them.

The topics covered in the presentation will include:

  • Identifying the different health plan options now available for U.S. citizens under the Affordable Care Act.
  • Understanding the process for applying to the program and the eligibility criteria.
  • Detecting resources for understanding the Affordable Care Act, and navigating the system.
Peterson
Dr. Peterson

“West Philadelphia is home to many uninsured and underserved residents who will benefit from the healthcare law,” said Dr. Peterson. “Our goal is to ensure attendees leave our event feeling more comfortable with the healthcare changes, as well as more aware of the different options available to them, and more familiar with navigating the website to apply for a healthcare plan.”

This event is free to attend, and advanced registration is not required. The University is easily accessed via public transportation, and visitor parking is also available to attendees. For more information regarding this event, contact Dr. Peterson at a.peters@usciences.edu or (215) 596-8877(215) 596-8877.215.596

At University of the Sciences, students embark on a challenging learning experience in a proving ground for successful professionals in the science and healthcare-related fields. A private institution dedicated to education, research, and service, and distinguished as the North America’s first college of pharmacy, the University has produced leaders in the science and healthcare marketplaces since its founding in 1821. Students in USciences’ five colleges learn to excel in scientific analysis and to apply their skills to improving healthcare in the lives of people worldwide through such disciplines as pharmacy, biology, chemistry, psychology, physics, physical therapy, healthcare business, and health policy. For more information, visit usciences.edu or follow us on Twitter @USciences.

03/10/2014

Getting 'Your Bell Rung' is No Music to the Ears, Says USciences Doc

AcquavellaAnthonyWhile concussions are most commonly associated with sports-related injuries, associate professor Anthony Acquavella, MD, at University of the Sciences in Philadelphia, says prevention and awareness begins by recognizing that these brain injuries can also result from slips and falls, playground injuries, and car accidents.

“Concussions are a force to be reckoned with because they are traumatic brain injuries that need to be identified and treated as soon as they occur to help prevent further complications, or even death,” said Dr. Acquavella, who also serves as a physician for the University’s student health service.

While March is designated as National Brain Injury Awareness Month, Dr. Acquavella said concussions and head injuries affect hundreds of individuals each day. Approximately 1.7 million people suffer from traumatic brain injuries each year, and concussions represent about 75 percent of those injuries, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

“Earlier this year, a USciences student suffered a concussion from a fall significant enough to take a medical leave from school, as concussion treatment requires thorough brain rest,” said Dr. Acquavella.

While concussions are typically caused by a bump, blow, or jolt to the head, they can also occur from impact to the body that causes the head and brain to move quickly back and forth, such as an injury suffered during a car accident. Observed signs of head injuries, includes individuals appearing dazed or stunned, forgetful, clumsy, and moody. Additionally, symptoms reported by individuals, includes headaches, nausea or vomiting, dizziness, blurred vision, and sensitivity to noise and light.

As of 2011, Pennsylvania has a law on the books which mandates that student athletes exhibiting concussion symptoms cannot return to play until cleared by appropriate healthcare professionals. But Dr. Acquavella said concussion awareness also needs to be a household conversation.

“I worked as a sideline physician for young athletes early in my career, and it was alarming how parents minimized the severity of head injuries in their children,” he said. “Concussion awareness begins by getting students, parents, teachers, and coaches on the same page with the causes, symptoms, and outcomes of head injuries.”

02/17/2014

There is ‘No Face to Eating Disorders,’ Says USciences Psychology Prof

Despite the common misconception that eating disorders affect primarily young women, prevention and awareness toward these diseases starts by recognizing that they do not discriminate by gender or age, said C. Alix Timko, PhD, director of the graduate psychology and Eating Disorder Research programs at University of the Sciences in Philadelphia.

As part of the upcoming National Eating Disorder Awareness Week, Feb. 23 to March 1, Dr. Timko emphasized that an estimated 25 million Americans suffer from eating disorders, a Timkond nearly 25 percent of those suffering are male.

“Eating disorders are not personal choices, diet fads or phases; they are severe and can be fatal,” said Dr. Timko, an international researcher who has written and spoken extensively on this topic. “In fact, anorexia nervosa has one of the highest overall mortality rates and the highest suicide rate of any psychiatric disorder.”

The American Psychiatric Association recognizes four primary eating disorders, including anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, binge-eating disorder, and eating disorder not otherwise specified.  While these disorders seem vastly different due to the difference in symptoms, individuals and their families face similar psychological, physical, and emotional challenges. Researchers have not established a single cause of an eating disorder, but they have identified numerous biological, social, psychological, and interpersonal factors that contribute to its development, said Dr. Timko.

There is no guaranteed way to identify if a friend of family member is at risk for eating disorders; however, there are a variety of easy-to-overlook signs that might help spot an eating disorder — or disorder in the making — sooner, including:

  • Dramatic weight loss and refusal to eat
  • Retreating to the bathroom for long periods of time after meals
  • Excessive exercise
  • Poor body image and negative comments about oneself

Under the direction of Dr. Timko, USciences’ Eating Disorder Research Program studies the development, treatment, and prevention of eating disorders. This program also aims to train new clinicians in the most evidence-based treatments for adolescents and adults with eating disorders. The University also offers students suffering from eating disorders counseling from therapists with a focus on health psychology; however, these services are not affiliated with Dr. Timko’s research program.

A variety of studies investigating eating disorders, body image, and eating behavior are currently underway by students and faculty at USciences, including Acceptance-Based Separated Family Treatment for Adolescents with Eating Disorders, Understanding Differences in Body Image in Women of Different Ethnic Groups, Psychosocial and Cultural Factors Influencing Craving, and Understanding Eating Behavior in College Students.

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