17 posts categorized "Chemistry"

10/02/2014

Physician Assistant Students to Celebrate PA Week, Oct. 6-12

Hewitt-5903National Physician Assistants Week, dubbed "PA Week," is held every year during the week of Oct. 6–12. Physician assistants across the country use this week to increase awareness of both the physician assistant profession and the importance of maintaining a healthy lifestyle.

You're invited to join students in the physician assistant studies program at USciences as they celebrate America’s more than 100,000 clinically practicing physician assistants during PA Week 2014. 

Be sure to follow the USciences twitter account at @USciences for photos, updates and fun facts about the University's physician assistant studies program throughout the week.

Monday, Oct. 6
9 a.m. Kick-Off Event in the USciences Quad

To kick off PA Week, the PA Society will be holding a fun information session on the physician assistant profession. As students walk through the quad, they can stop and answer a question from the trivia board to win a small prize (sticker). The trivia board includes questions on the history of the profession and general medical knowledge. This event will bring awareness to the campus community and community-at-large about this exciting profession and the future of U.S. healthcare.

In the case of rain, the event will be moved to STC. Questions? Contact Rachel Harris at rharris@mail.usciences.edu.

Tuesday, Oct. 7

10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Leg Up Farms Fundraising
In front of Wilson Dining Hall

A bake sale will be held outside of dining hall to raise money for the Host City Charity for Pennsylvania Society of Physician Assistants annual conference in Lancaster. Questions? Contact Alex Ellis at aellis1000@mail.usciences.edu.

5 p.m Challenge Bowl: Family Feud Style
IPEX room 239-240

Physician assistant studies students in the undergraduate and graduate programs will compete in a trivia bowl with questions ranging from popular culture, sports, medicine and anatomy. This event promotes collaboration and bonding between students in both programs. Questions? Contact A’lanne Conrad at aconrad@mail.usciences.edu.

Wednesday, Oct. 8
Health Fair: Health Initiatives for a Healthy Campus
USciences Quad

The health fair will include six stations:

  • BP and HR
  • Stress reduction and emotional well-being (in coordination with SHAC)
  • Safe sex practices
  • Smoking cessations
  • Negative effects of binge drinking
  • Exercise and nutrition

As future healthcare providers, PA students will be responsible for many levels of care. An especially important aspect of care is health education. The health fair will benefit both the PA program and the university community by addressing relevant health concerns for the campus. Questions? Contact Maxi Drakopoulos at mdrakopoulos@mail.usciences.edu.

Thursday, Oct. 9
10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Leg Up Farms Fundraising
In front of Wilson Dining Hall

Click here to watch USciences' physician assistant studies students in action during the University's recent IPEX ribbon cutting ceremony on Sept. 18.

07/08/2014

Doctoral Student to Present Award-Winning Research at ACS Meeting in San Francisco

AraA biochemistry doctoral student at University of the Sciences is set to travel across the country next month to present his award-winning research during the American Chemical Society's (ACS) meeting in San Francisco. Ara Abramyan PhD’15 was one of five U.S. recipients of the highly competitive ACS Chemical Computing Group Excellence Award for Graduate Students.

Abramyan won for his research titled, “Computational studies of aromatic foldamer helices: molecular encapsulation and handedness inversion.” Vojislava Pophristic, PhD, chair of the Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry at USciences; and Zhiwei Liu, PhD, assistant professor of chemistry, served as research advisors and mentors for this project.

The five award recipients' research projects will be recognized at the award presentation ceremony during the ACS Division of Computers in Chemistry Poster Session on Tuesday, Aug. 12. Abramyan will also receive an award certificate, a one-year molecular operating environment software license for his research group, as well as $1,150 to cover his travel costs to San Francisco.

Sanfran-generalDuring his time as a student, researcher, and teaching assistant at USciences, Abramyan has received many honors, including the University’s Graduate Excellence in Research Award, Graduate Excellence in Teaching Award, and the Abraham Glasser Endowed Fellowship; as well as the ACS Chemical Computing Group Excellence Award and a research grant from University of Chicago.

"Ara is an exceptional biochemistry PhD student, as well as graduate student instructor," said Dr. Pophristic. "His award – together with the ACS award alumnus Eleonora Gianti PhD'13 won in 2010 – speaks volumes about the quality of education and research conducted by our biochemistry students and faculty.”

Abramyan earned a master’s degree in drug discovery from the University College London, University of London; as well as a master’s degree in pharmacy from First Moscow State Medical University in Russia.

The theme for this fall's meeting is "Chemistry & Global Stewardship," and the four-day event will kick off Aug. 10 and run through Aug. 14. More than 15,000 chemists, scholars, students, and other professionals are expected to gather at the event; and more than 7,400 papers will be presented, and nearly 4,400 poster presentations will take place. 

Follow the conference on social media by using the hashtag #ACSsanfran.

06/18/2014

Nearly 100 Philly Middle Schoolers Explore STEM Careers at USciences

IMG_1861As part of an ongoing commitment to Philadelphia schools and science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) education, University of the Sciences hosted its first Career Day for Middle School Students on May 9.

Held in conjunction with state Rep. James Roebuck (D-Philadelphia), University City Science Center, and three local middle schools, a half-day program focusing on STEM careers was developed by USciences faculty and staff for nearly 100 local students from Samuel B. Huey School, Jubilee School, and The City School.

University president Helen Giles-Gee, PhD, kicked off the day with welcome remarks, which included her hope and expectation that one day the young students would attend USciences. The fifth-graders were also given a tour of USciences’ campus by student ambassadors, and participated in a science expo held by students and faculty from chemistry, biology, mathematics, physics, pharmacy, and pharmacology/toxicology programs.

IMG_1829They had the opportunity to participate in hands-on demonstrations and experiments highlighting the STEM academic disciplines, and then experienced lunch in a college dining hall. The day wrapped up with a presentation on career interest and exploration.

Click here to see all photos from the day.

Participating staff and faculty, included: Kimberly Bryant, director of career services; Kevin Wolbach, interim associate dean of Misher College of Arts and Sciences; Catherine Bentzley, PhD, associate professor of chemistry and biochemistry; Grace Farber, PhD, assistant professor of biology; Carl Walasek, statistics instructor; Scott Greene, director of the Student Excellence and Professional Preparation programs; Mary Kate McGinty, director of government and community affairs; and Danielle Stollak, program manager of University City Science Center's STEAM Initiatives.

04/24/2014

Medical Laboratory Science Student Turns Internship into Full-Time Job

MedtechMedical laboratory professionals are the behind-the-scenes backbone of healthcare, which is perfectly fine for Stephanie Noblit MT’14, a University of the Sciences student who admittedly prefers to keep a low profile.

“Medical laboratory professionals play a crucial role in the medical field because our work aids in the detection, diagnosis, and treatment of various diseases and medical conditions,” said Noblit, a fourth-year in the Medical Laboratory Science Program at USciences. “Most often, patients assume that their physicians are responsible for evaluating their lab tests and results, but that’s our job in the healthcare field.”

Noblit is one of eight students from surrounding universities who have spent the school year putting their educations to use in the laboratory of Pennsylvania Hospital. At the internship, Noblit is also joined by her fellow USciences classmate, Antonio Esparza MT’14. Upon graduating this spring and completing her internship in July, Noblit will join the hospital’s laboratory staff as a full-time employee.

During her internship, Noblit has helped a team of pathologists and medical laboratory scientists, technicians, and specialists work together to solve the mysteries, put the pieces of the puzzle together, and answer the critical questions of medicine.

“Stephanie has an understanding of the concepts that allow her to analyze and solve the real medical problems she is now encountering in her internship,” said Margaret Reinhart, director of the Medical Laboratory Science Program.

Because the healthcare industry is one of the fastest growing career fields, job outlook is expected to remain positive. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, medical laboratory positions are expected to increase by nearly 20 percent through 2016 – a rapid spike when compared to the average career growth rate.

Noblit credits her education and faculty mentorships to her success in her internship. She noted that she and Esparza were among the best prepared interns when it came time to handle the real-life scenarios they faced in the laboratory this year.

Click here for more information regarding the USciences' Medical Laboratory Science Program.

04/11/2014

VIDEO: 6abc Highlights Students, Faculty at USciences Research Day

 
 
6abc showcased the diversity and growth of research pursuits at University of the Sciences during its 12th Annual Research Day and 27th Annual John C. Krantz, Jr., Distinguished Lecture on Thursday, April 10. Research Day recognizes and highlights the research efforts of faculty, as well as undergraduate and graduate students, to encourage and promote communication and collaboration among researchers.
 
USciences distinguishes itself by offering undergraduate students the opportunity to conduct research early in their academic careers. The diverse research activity that was on display spanned several aspects of the University’s scholarly pursuits, including:
  • Determining occupational therapists’ role in working with pediatric cancer patients
  • Discovering the personality traits that cause adolescents to kill
  • Using yoga to improve quality of life for patients with anorexia nervosa
  • Identifying predictors of successful post-secondary transitions for autistic students

02/24/2014

Alumni Seminar Series features Dr. Richard C. Remsing C’08

RemsingThe Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry brings prominent graduates back to their alma mater through its Alumni Seminar Series. On Feb. 17, alumnus Richard C. Remsing C'08, PhD, joined USciences for an accepted students “Chemistry Day.” He engaged prospective scholars with an active panel discussion and lectured for current students.

 “I hope to join a university faculty, begin teaching, and continue research,” Dr. Remsing said on his future goals. “I want to provoke passion in students about the incredible field of chemistry.”

After graduating from USciences in 2008, Dr. Remsing earned a doctorate degree in chemical physics from the University of Maryland. He currently holds a postdoctoral research position at University of Pennsylvania in the Department of Chemical and Bimolecular Engineering.

As an undergraduate commuter, Dr. Remsing had to fill a significant amount of time between classes with on-campus activities. Research fit this schedule nicely, and he published eight papers before completing his bachelors degree.

The team Dr. Remsing worked with during those years was the first to demonstrate an ecological method of extracting cellulose from wood – in other words: eco-friendly paper pulp. Dr. Remsing then moved from studying ionic liquids and other aspects of physical chemistry to the field of theoretical physics.

Today, he is a theorist: using computer systems to explain the principles governing molecular interactions and building models describing these findings.

“Statistical Mechanics was my favorite class at USciences,” said Dr. Remsing. “It was a preview of what I do now with computer simulation, and introduced me to a different type of research that I continue to use.”

02/06/2014

The Biggest Mistakes Transfer Students Make

Viggiani_aimeeChoosing which college to attend is a huge decision for students. Whether they’ve earned their associate’s degrees from community colleges and ready to move on to earn their bachelor’s degrees, or currently enrolled in four-year schools that aren’t the right fit, one-third of all students transfer at least once before earning a degree.

Aimee Viggiani, associate director of transfer admissions, was recently featured in two articles which provide helpful tips for transfer students. She said, "All too often, students wait until too late in their college careers to ask why a certain class didn't transfer. Even if you don't need the credit right away, you may need it in the future. So ask transfer credit questions as soon as possible."

09/19/2013

Learning and Living the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act in Real Time

This fall, masters and doctoral students in the Department of Health Policy and Public Health at University of the Sciences are examining the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) as it evolves in real time.

MetrauxIn the seminar course led by Steve Metraux, PhD, associate professor of health policy and public health, graduate students meet weekly to discuss topics such as the politics that led to the passage of the ACA, how the ACA fits into the history of healthcare reform in the United States, the legal and constitutional aspects of the ACA, and the nuts and bolts of the ACA.

A range of experts, both from the USciences faculty and from the greater Philadelphia region will join the seminar to lead discussions and explain how the ACA impacts particular facets of health and health care.

But beyond that, the seminar will seek to capture history-in-the-making by following the day-to-day events related to the ACA as its key component, the insurance exchanges, start their open enrollment.

Issa_Portrait“Watching the biggest health policy story in years unfold week by week adds a new dimension of excitement to studying policy,” said Dr. Metraux. “This seminar seeks to provide students with the tools not only to understand how we got here, but also to assess how such policy might likely unfold.”

Amalia M. Issa, PhD, professor and chair of health policy and public health, added, “Our students are going to be on the front lines of healthcare delivery and shaping policy. They need to have an understanding of the Act, apply their critical thinking skills to the issues, and evaluate the impact of the ACA on addressing current and future problems in health systems.”

09/18/2013

PCP Student: High Tech Tools for Medication Adherence

Anita Pothen is currently a 6th year pharmacy student at the University of the Sciences-Philadelphia College of Pharmacy. In addition to her interests in medication adherence and writing, Anita's pharmacy-related experiences include working in retail, hospital and government agency settings. - See more at: http://www.starlifebrands.com/author/apothen/#sthash.qLh4jlSX.d

Anita Pothen PharmD'14, published an article in Star Life Sciences Medical Monitor on Sept. 18, 2013, titled, "High Tech Tools for Medication Adherence."

Medication adherence is a topic of interest for healthcare providers, caregivers, and payers — and, of course, patients. Practitioners work hard to select optimal drug therapy for their patients, but they don’t always see the expected clinical improvements.

Click here to read the full article...

Medication adherence is a topic of interest for healthcare providers, caregivers, and payers—and, of course, patients. Practitioners work hard to select optimal drug therapy for their patients, but they don’t always see the expected clinical improvements. This inefficacy in treatment often stems from patients’ inability - See more at: http://www.starlifebrands.com/author/apothen/#sthash.qLh4jlSX.dpuf

09/16/2013

Health Tip: Skinny, Fat, Old, Young: All at Risk for High Cholesterol

image from www.gradschool.usciences.eduTo attract customers, restaurant chains have been rolling out budget deals, offering $5 pizzas, $3 meals — even $1 sandwiches. But while these new offerings are light on its customers’ wallets, they hit them where it hurts in terms of calories, fat, and sodium content.

Unfortunately, some of most common patrons of these restaurants are college students looking to get the best bang for their buck. In observance of National Cholesterol Education Month, Karin Richards, interim chair of the Department of Kinesiology and program director of health sciences at University of Sciences, addresses important heart-healthy tips to help college students avoid serious health conditions down the road.

 “Nobody can eat anything they want and stay heart-healthy because all body types are at risk for high cholesterol,” said Richards. “While overweight people are more likely to have high cholesterol, thin people should also have their cholesterol checked regularly because people who don’t gain weight easily are less aware of how much fat they actually consume.”

  1. Check your family tree. Familial hypercholesterolemia is a disorder of high LDL, or bad, cholesterol that is passed down through families, which means it is inherited. Because the condition begins at birth and can cause heart attacks at an early age, it is vital for young adults to be in tune with their families’ health backgrounds.
  2. Moderation is key. While fried and fast foods do not have to be completely eliminated from diets; they should be consumed sporadically rather than every day.
  3. Substitute foods. Because egg yolk boasts high cholesterol, opt for egg whites instead. The same concept can be applied when choosing snacks, go for air popped popcorn over potato chips. There’s a healthy alternative to every meal.
  4. Get moving. Too many people focus on their diets, and neglect exercise. Aim to “move” for 30 minutes each day by taking the stairs instead of the elevator, parking further away in a parking lot, or jogging, walking, biking, and rollerblading as means of transportation. 
  5. Get screened. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention , the level of bad cholesterol among young adults ranges from 7 percent to 26 percent; however, the screening rate among this age group is less than 50 percent.

Richards said University of the Sciences students are offered free cholesterol and body composition screenings through its Department of Kinesiology. If abnormal results are recorded, students are encouraged to visit their primary care providers for further examination.

“Sometimes it takes eye-opening results for young adults to see that they are not invincible to potentially fatal health conditions, like heart disease. It’s never too late to start the transformation to a healthy lifestyle,” said Richards.

Richards obtained a Master of Science in sport management from Slippery Rock University, and is currently pursuing her doctorate in health policy at USciences. She is nationally certified as a wellness practitioner and wellness program coordinator by the National Wellness Institute, National Strength and Conditioning Association, and American College of Sports Medicine.
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